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24, 2012. we will begin this morning with your thoughts on religion and politics. as a religion influence your political decisions? also send us your tweet if you go to twitter.com -- we will begin with the sunday review section of the "the new york times" yesterday. we want to get your take on this. it does religion influence your politics? with more people saying they are unaffiliated. we want to get your take. here are some comments from facebook this morning. what are your thoughts on this december 24, 2012. it does religion influence your politics? let me show you this from "the new york times" this morning. a new poll out worldwide religion shows up that one out of six follows no religion. that is worldwide. all religions outside the united states as well. the upi story. religious identity affect voter choice. and then on the 2012 election, here is the pew forum on religion and public policy -- dorothy and baltimore, maryland. independent caller. what do you think? does religion influence your politics? caller: it does influence me somewhat but not so much now -- this time
is what is coming out this christmas day. george will talks about the relationship between religion and politics. then, singer/songwriter james taylor from a recent appearance of the national press club. after that, first lady michelle obama holds a holiday party with goldstar families. >> by the time i was 9 years old, i was handed leaflets for robert kennedy, and i always say when i was 10 and made the decision and broke with the democratic party, and went to work for john lindsay, who was running for mayor of new york. i went to the liberal party headquarters. i was handing out leaflets on the street corner in the new york. someone thought it was really cute, a little boy handed out leaflets, and she ask me why, and then made the case and the case against the opponent as well, and she said this was for you, and she handed me a box that looked like pastries, the white box with strings. i took it back to the liberal party headquarters, and there were all these doughnuts and a wad of $10 bills. in one of my early lessons in politics, the district leader grabbed the money and he said
:00 a.m. eastern on c-span. columnist in a news analyst talks about the relationship with religion and american politics. he was introduced by the former missouri senator and ambassador to the united nations and john danforth. from washington university, this is an hour-and-a-half. >> finally, it is my honor to introduce senator john danforth, who will introduce mr. will. the senator is a partner with the law firm. he graduated with honors from princeton university, where he majored in religion. he received a bachelor of divinity degree from yale divinity school and a bachelor of laws degree from yale law school. he practiced law for some years and began his political career in 1968 when he was elected attorney general of missouri in his first place for public office. missouri voters elected him to the u.s. senate in 1976. they reelected him in 1982 and 1988, for a total of 18 years of service. the senator initiated major legislation in international trade, telecommunications, health care, research and development, transportation, and civil rights. he was later appointed special co
between religion and politics. james taylor and his recent appearance at the national press club. later, michelle obama shows children the white house holiday decorations. >> by the time i was 9 years old, i was handing out leaflets for robert kennedy. when i was 10, i made a big decision and broke with the democratic party. i went to work for john lindsay, who was running as mayor for new york. i was handing out leaflets on the street corner in new york. some woman thought this was soberly cute -- was really cute and she asked me why. i made the case against his opponent. she said, that is so cute. she hands me a box of -- zero white box with strain. i ticket back to the liberal party headquarters. there were all these doughnuts and a wad of $10 bills. one of my early lessons you can keep the doughnuts. >> obama campaign strategist david axelrod on his life and journalism and politics. at 10:45, the groin that in the white house -- growing up in the white house. >> george will spoke recently at washington university in st. louis about the role of religion and politics. the speech was h
on the basis -- outlawed discrimination on the basis of discrimination -- religion, and sex. and 1950s, law firms, and some of the finest graduates were saying they wanted no women. they would feel uncomfortable dealing with a woman, or as often her, we hired a woman at this from once, and she was dreadful. how many men did they hire that didn't work out? so it wasn't easy to get that first job. first job was all important because if you got it and performed well, then the next job was secure. well, i had a great professor, someone may know you -- some of you may know his name, he was the first constitutional law scholar, and he was in charge of getting judicial clerkship for columbia law school students. and i was special. he was determined to give me a federal clerkship. so he recommended me to a judge who always hired his law clerks from columbia. and then -- [inaudible] is ruth bader ginsburg. she has a four year old daughter. how can i rely on her? and the professor said, give her a chance. if she doesn't work out, there's a man in her class who will step in and take over for her. if y
-government. religion didn't tolerate it in political culture and family culture does not tolerate it. this is a lost cause. we must not involve ourselves. so he would not involve less in trying to change the culture of the people in the middle east. these are people with no history, political history or religious history of self-government. they don't know what it means. >> and what would you like? >> i'm not quite sure what he was late. >> even federalists would be appalled at the federal government intrusion in our lives today. it is in every area of our lives. veterans commit the troops bedrooms, living rooms, garages, rose, everywhere the federal government is in our lives and that would have appalled the most extreme federalists who founded this type of government. the first thing he would done, patrick and i would have gone right along with him. they would've gone in your bedroom and threats of attack that tag for the mattress. >> will entertain questions for the audience. they urge you in homage brian lamb, founder of c-span who tuning asks the best questions, which are simple and direct, we
many ethnicities, nationalities, religions, and yet we are bound together as one people because of our allegiance and our respect and our reverence for the constitution, and this is a link, a tie, a bond to our history and to our heritage. that is unique or almost unique in the world. this tie that we have to our constitution that defines us gives us stability and a purpose and a mission to our people. and it is the envy of the rest of the world. the british revere their constitution as well. not quite the same. william gladstone, prime minister of england, at one time talked -- compared the american and thening lish -- the english constitution. he began by saying the english constitution was grown, the american substitution was something that was made. if you ended there, you might have thought it was rather patronizing, the english constitution was made and the american constitution, made. he went on to refer to the american constitution in the most laudatory an complementary of terms. he said in that same statement, just as the british constitution is the most shuttle organism ever
," john barry recounts the life of the theologian and his thoughts on the division of religion and politics. former secretary of state madeleine albright recounts her childhood in czechoslovakia during the nazi invasion in "prague winter." in bill veeck, paul dickson details the life of the advocate for racial equality and players' economic rights. damien ec cols in "life after death." for an extended links of various publications' 2012 notable book
. hamilton responded by saying jefferson was a fanatic in politics and an atheist in religion, and anonymous letter writer once wrote: i think you ought to get a damn kicking, you redheaded son of a bitch. [laughter] so i know, i know karl rove wants to think he invented all of this, but -- [laughter] we've been, we've been fighting these battles for a long time. so jefferson himself saw that we were always going to be divided. he said that men have divided themselves over the opinions of whether the interests of the many or the interests of the nobles should govern the affairs of men since these questions convulsed greece and rome. he was looking back at greece and rome in the way we look back at the founding to try to figure out how much of this division, how much of the divided opinion is natural, how much is unnatural, and how do you manage and try to do what you can with what we have. and his answer, wonderfully, was in theory he would want to go back to monticello. you know those wonderful quotations, we all know them. oh, if i could only be with my books and at my farm and at my famil
should extend discrimination law, or you should protect the free exercise of religion to the greatest extent possible? we would get these cases and resolve them in terms of a particular liberal or conservative political agenda. there are ways of characterizing us that make more sense in terms of what we do. some of my colleagues prefer to adhere strictly to that text of the statute. others of my colleagues look more expensively to what we call the legislative history of the background of the statute, or a purpose, and it makes sense to refer to them in those terms. some of those think it is important what the framers of the constitution were thinking about at the founding when they drafted it. others on the court take a more flexible view and think that the interpretation of the constitution should be informed by evolutionary developments. those sorts of things make sense. it is easier, i think, for court reporters to say that justice is liberal and that justice is conservative, and i do not think it is helpful in looking at what we do. >> let me switch to a question about -- more int
Search Results 0 to 9 of about 10